Contemplation of the Rain

Let the dams be damned and ameliorate this famined land.

Upon what hills will you take a stand; amidst what turmoil will your integrity begin to disband?

Our resolve weakens, our countenance grays, yet a force continues to uphold our inner constitution. The nature of numbness raises doubts about whether it’s life or us that we should be praying about.

Unsure, we forget to let it out; no words pierce the silence, no vibrations ripple through the air.

We aren’t even sure how much it is that we truly care. We’ve moved passed the point of wanting to rip out our hair and rather have begun to embrace the catatonic stare.

Becoming increasingly less aware of what our left-hand does as we observe the ramifications of having lived a one-sided life for so long, dependent and trusting only of the right:

What good are either of these sides anymore? Where is the animosity of division when everyone’s poor? Rather, life’s questions confront us with more intensity than they did before, pestering us to decide some sort of answer to the question: “What is life for?”

Yet, no answers come; only noting how keenly one has become of observing the rising sun and how quickly it seems to run back into the shadows from whence it comes.

A repetition set for an undetermined amount of iterations – the next question becomes: “What have I done?”

Repetitions in Search of Meaning

Sprouts burst forth anew;

Leaves manifest from within to allow, once more, for there to be a thickening.

Where is it that we are destined?

            Will there be true rest again –

                        What about frivolities with friends?

Why do we bother so much with the questions of where does this train end when we spend most our time preparing, pretending, or digging our heels in defending against the march of time?

Always forward. Always moving toward, yet never arriving.

It’s doubtful that many of us care much about if/where time reaches its destination; instead, we’re more preoccupied with which timeslot our departure is booked for.

Some of us can become worked up into fits over the unknowns of this whole ordeal with time; it’s particularly fascinating when one’s worries about things of time reach a point where they’re unable to allow themselves sleep at night.

Of course, this makes some innate sense; after all, sleep punctuates our days by plunging us into the voidless unknown or the mysterious manifestations of the involuntary experiences of dreams – wouldn’t this experience be the most apt comparison to gain some sort of understanding of what the experience will be like when the clock’s hand finally moves to the top, and life as we know it either ceases and stops or continues in a peculiar fashion?

Societal Observations

I have spent too much time observing human behavior, especially on social media platforms, and here are my takeaways at this moment in time:

That resisting medicine is heroism, but so too is embracing it; that freedom of religion means deciding how others should practice theirs; that the goal of a vocation is to someday not have one; that one’s freedom of speech is to defend one’s right to avoid thinking.

That righteousness is determined by the admiration of others; that education is to avoid the uncomfortableness of inconvenient truths; that entitlement is the issue, unless you’re the beneficiary.

That to be a patriot is to be unreflective to the point of resisting change; and that to be woke is to be engrossed with change to the point of being outraged by the shortcomings of others—both in the name of freedom. This is what I have seen, and I laughed.

This was inspired by the observations of Soren Kierkegaard during his time:

“When I was young, I forgot how to laugh in the cave of Trophonius; when I was older, I opened my eyes and beheld reality, at which I began to laugh, and since then, I have not stopped laughing. I saw that the meaning of life was to secure a livelihood, and that its goal was to attain a high position; that love’s rich dream was marriage with an heiress; that friendship’s blessing was help in financial difficulties; that wisdom was what the majority assumed it to be; that enthusiasm consisted in making a speech; that it was courage to risk the loss of ten dollars; that kindness consisted in saying, “You are welcome,” at the dinner table; that piety consisted in going to communion once a year. This I saw, and I laughed.”