Now What?

And who can argue for the living when confronted with the grave need to litigate for the dead?

Where do we go from here as we look off the face of this ledge?

Walk away, shake our head, go to bed and blame the issues on what’s wrong in other peoples’ heads.

What good does this do for the land of the living? Where are the debates of the corporeal? And why is it that those with whom we disagree somehow reside in a lesser reality?

Why bother to debate about the unborn or where we go when we die when the land of the living has become but a standstill, where even reason has found its capacity to cry?

“Oh, let’s have a debate,” they’ll say, but it disintegrates the moment of invoking things of the transcendent. We muddy our own waters with our dual-mindedness of both wanting to be right and to prove others wrong – yet, we like to nod our heads and go along with all those with charisma who play the song: it’s not us who are lost but them. Thus, it’s not me who is lost but him. Thus, the problems that exist are among those things outside of myself.

How dangerous it is to live in the fantastical lands such as these, where behind every door there must be some new mystery? The search is never over; the investigation never done, and the anticipation of the revelatory moment somehow still yet to be won…

But, alas, as to be expected with such things—we mustn’t concern ourselves with these things—rather, look another way to find a friend, and together we’ll find our fellowship in scapegoating a common foe.

We’ll vent and fume before sighing and saying, “What is life but full of woes?”

Oh, how we sow and sow—sometimes even forgetting to reap…even secretly, restraining ourselves from making a peep about the disharmony of the cycle. Why have we become so maniacal? Because of our love to sow and bask in the flow of more and more – after all, what is all of our work for?

This question takes a dark turn when the sowing has been overdone. There’s no land left to till, and no straw to continue to feed the spinning wheel—what is one to do when idleness creeps into one’s hands? Exercise patience, sort the harvest, and pursue leisure as a source of gain? A laughable notion, as absurd as turning water into rain, fears into pain, and grain into gold…but, then again, we are all getting old; it’s possible the same rules no longer hold…to venture closer to the edge and peer a bit further or to stay and stand firm in the trust bestowed from the ground beneath our feet—what if your feet begin to sink?
Would you fight and climb or say everything’s all fine; cry out to the world, “are we all losing our minds?” Then turn back around and continue with the dinner table discourse.

Perceptual Differences in ADHD

ADHD continues to gain interest throughout those who do and do not have the diagnosis alike. Why is interest in this neurodevelopmental disorder gaining traction? Likely, it is a confluence of events, namely the movement toward neurodiversity, increasing acknowledgement of adult-diagnosed ADHD, and a continued normalization of mental health, in general.

As one of the most well-researched diagnosis, ADHD has been one of the first to lose some of its mental health stigma; however, this movement has been, in part, a result of a growing understanding that ADHD is not solely about difficult behaviors in children but also differences in information processing in adults (i.e., neurodiversity).

One of the hallmark features of these differences in perception between those with ADHD versus neurotypical individuals is an altered sense of time. Time perspectives, put extremely simply, different preferences in where people typically orient their attention in time, such as being future-oriented or past-oriented (see Philip Zimbardo writings for more on time perspectives).

While typically individuals have one that is preferred over the other time perspectives, Dr. William Dodson puts forth the notion that those with ADHD are immersed in the present. Thus, ADHDers have difficulty, likely at the expense of excessive working memory, to differentiate between time perspectives, such as being able to disentangle future events into categories like short-term, intermediate, and long-term future states. Conversely, the past is loosely structured, if at all, in typical time structures of memory and, collectively, the present is somewhat mixed together with the past and future. Dr. Dodson describes this state of time perception as being curvilinear, which is defined by Dictionary.com as “consisting of or bounded by curved lines.”

While this definition doesn’t clarify much more of what is meant by having a curvilinear perception of time, Dr. Dodson’s usage of the term is in respect to the point that people with ADHD have a skewed sense of time, and it’s particularly skewed toward the present. Therefore, this bias in time perspective could substantiate Dr. Dodson’s conception that ADHD makes it difficult to distinguish, or parse out, the future and past from the present moment.

If this is the case with ADHD, then it would help to explain ADHDers’ challenges with learning from past mistakes and effectively planning for the future. One extension from this idea is it’s likely also the case that ADHD impacts spatial processing, since space and time are interrelated. Collectively, it would stand to reason that the ability to conjure and manipulate mental representations may be a central aspect to the symptoms present in ADHD; moreover, this inability or deficit may be a transdiagnostic symptom of other psychiatric diagnoses.

Reference:

Hallowell, E., MD, & Ratey, J., MD. (2022, January 10). ADHD Needs a Better Name. We Have One. ADDitude. https://www.additudemag.com/attention-deficit-disorder-vast/?fbclid=IwAR3dvgGPAykYKUdsAiDqPRSv97fF1XV7SdmRVv_sUH-G_GXW0W_QlzjDc4g

A Decisive Moment in Time

Where are the heroes of old?
Are we still under the spell from adopting the lies we were sold?
At what point do we bend at the knees and fold?
Will healing come through being told that we were right;
or is there still a need to fight, wielding our words as knives used to split the wheat from the chaff?
How much longer must we wear this mask of pretense and deny the realities of tragedies, sorrows, hardships, and the sea of disbelief that dwell within?
When will it be the time to adopt the elements that comprise the realm of real and acknowledge and allow ourselves to truly feel?
Do we still have time to deny what’s real in exchange for the comfort derived from sharing in our collective fantasies?
At what point will the wellspring within burst forth demanding our attention and requiring the cohesive and full functioning of all our specific capacities?